One Jump Ahead pp 127-133 | Cite as

As Close to Perfection As Humanly Possible

  • Jonathan Schaeffer

Abstract

So, who was this great Marion Tinsley, world checkers champion, whom I kept hearing about? Supposedly he was good, but how good could that be? After all, the world of chess clearly showed that even the world champions were mortals, losing a game or two a year. But the vibrations I felt from the checkers players told me there was something special here. It was with reverence, not disrespect, that players referred to him as the Terrible Tinsley. Everyone was afraid of him, but only for his play over the board. Away from the board he was universally liked. It seemed as if everyone considered him to be their friend.

Keywords

Black Church Chess Player World Championship Strong Player World Champion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    William Hartston, “Can God Beat the Computer,” The Independent, August 17, 1992.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    From Checkers the Tinsley Way, p. 70 (see Further Reading).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ibid., p. 82.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ibid., p. 89.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Ibid., p. 144.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Quoted from: D onna St. George, “ T he U nsung Champion of Checkers,” Philadelphia Inquirer, A pril 11, 1993.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Jim Propp, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, unpublished document.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    In a simultaneous exhibition, the champion usually plays twenty to forty opponents at the same time. You make a move on one board and then move on to the next, going around the room in circles until all the games are completed.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    The Independent, August 17, 1992.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Jim Propp, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, unpublished document.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Raymond Keene, Byron Jacobs, and Tony Buzan address this question in Man v Machine: The ACM Chess Challenge, B.B. Enterprises, Sussex, Great Britain, 1996. The only serious contender (in my opinion) is Oyama Yasuharu. He was a strong shogi (Japanese chess) player for forty-five years, during twenty of which he totally dominated the sport.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Schaeffer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computing ScienceUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada

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