Social and Psychological Characteristics

  • Bernice L. Neugarten
  • Susan C. Reed

Abstract

Long life is a major achievement of the twentieth century in all developed countries of the world. The average life expectancy at birth in the United States has now reached 75 years, and it is expected to keep rising (Table 4.1). It is not only that people are living longer. Primarily because of lower birth rates, the proportions of older to younger people are increasing, producing a shift in the overall age distribution of the society that is expressed by the term the aging society.

Keywords

Government Printing Psychological Characteristic Aging Society Private Pension Current Population Report 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernice L. Neugarten
  • Susan C. Reed

There are no affiliations available

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