Wetlands of the Great Plains: Habitat Characteristics and Vertebrate Aggregations

  • Murray K. Laubhan
  • Leigh H. Fredrickson
Chapter
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 125)

Abstract

Grassland, the largest biome in North America, is characterized by the uniform presence of perennial grasses that originally supported extensive populations of native ungulates (e.g., buffalo [Bison bison], pronghorn [Antilocapra americana]) and burrowing mammals (Shelford 1949). The Great Plains, a component of the northern temperate grassland, encompasses about 20% (200 million ha) of the land mass in the 48 conterminous United States (Willson 1995). The region receives scant rainfall and exhibits extremes in climatic conditions within and among seasons and years. Although climatic conditions in the Great Plains do not favor the perpetuation of numerous, naturally occurring permanent wetlands, historic records indicate that ephemeral, temporary, and seasonal wetlands once were a prominent feature throughout the region.

Keywords

Great Plain Wetland Type Wetland Habitat Tallgrass Prairie Northern Great Plain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Murray K. Laubhan
  • Leigh H. Fredrickson

There are no affiliations available

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