Developing Linkages between Theory and Intervention in Stress and Coping Processes

  • Irwin N. Sandler
  • Sharlene A. Wolchik
  • David MacKinnon
  • Tim S. Ayers
  • Mark W. Roosa
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

The constructs of stress and coping have held an important role in theories about the development of problems of childhood and adolescents and in intervention models about how to prevent the occurrence of such problems (Haggerty, Sherrod, Garmezy, & Rutter, 1994; Rolf, Masten, Cicchetti, Nuechterlein, & Weintraub, 1990; Cowen, 1980; Mrazek & Haggerty, 1994; Hetherington & Blechman, 1996). Stress has been implicated in the development of a wide range of problems, and a rich literature has developed on factors that enable children to be resilient against the negative effects of stress (Gore & Eckenrode, 1994). In a parallel fashion, improving child and adolescent adaptation to stress has been identified as one of the most promising approaches to preventing the development of problems of childhood and adolescence (Compas, Phares, & Ledoux, 1989; Cowen, 1985; Bloom, 1990). For example, in their comprehensive annotated bibliography of primary prevention programs between 1983 and 1991, Trickett, Dahiyal, and Selby (1994) identified 169 citations concerning prevention programs under the headings of stressful life events, social support, and crisis intervention. Many of these stress-based preventive interventions have been empirically evaluated and found to have beneficial effects (Mrazek & Haggerty, 1994; Price, Cowen, Lorion, & Ramos-McKay, 1988). Unfortunately, however, the links between the theoretical and intervention research literatures are not strong.

Keywords

Social Support Coping Strategy Community Psychology Program Effect Coping Resource 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Irwin N. Sandler
    • 1
  • Sharlene A. Wolchik
    • 1
  • David MacKinnon
    • 1
  • Tim S. Ayers
    • 1
  • Mark W. Roosa
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychology and Program for Prevention ResearchArizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  2. 2.Department of Family Resources and Human Development and Program for Prevention ResearchArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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