An Integrated Approach to Treating Adults Abused as Children, with Specific Reference to Self-Reported Recovered Memories

  • John Briere
  • J. Don Read
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 291)

Abstract

Research conducted over the last two decades suggests that sexual abuse is both common in North American society and associated with a variety of subsequent psychological difficulties. Although not all child abuse appears to confer significant long-term effects, sequelae of childhood sexual abuse often documented in the literature include anxiety and depression (e.g., Bagley & Ramsay, 1986; Stein, Golding, Seigel, Burnham, & Sorenson, 1989), posttraumatic stress (e.g., Rowan, Foy, Rodriguez, & Ryan, 1994; Saunders, Villeponteaux, Lipovsky, Kilpatrick, & Veronen, 1992), dissociative symptoms (e.g., Briere, Elliott, Harris, & Cotman 1995; Chu & Dill, 1990), cognitive disturbance such as low self-esteem and helplessness (e.g., Gold, 1986; Jehu, Gazan, & Klassen, 1984-85), suicidality (e.g., Briere & Runtz, 1986; de Wilde, Klienhorst, Diekstra, & Wolters, 1992), substance abuse (e.g., Swett, Cohen, Surrey, Compaine, & Chavez, 1991; Rohsenow, Corbett, & Devine, 1988), sexual dysfunction (e.g., Becker, Skinner, Abel, & Treacy, 1982; Wyatt, Newcombe, & Riederle, 1993), interpersonal problems (e.g., Elliott, 1994; Herman, 1981) and personality disorders (Briere & Zaidi, 1989; Ogata, Silk, Goodrich, Lohr, Westen, & Hill, 1990).

Keywords

Sexual Abuse Child Abuse Childhood Sexual Abuse Posttraumatic Stress Disorder False Memory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Briere
    • 1
  • J. Don Read
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Southern California School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.University of LethbridgeLethbridgeCanada

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