Increasing Sensitivity

  • D. Stephen Lindsay
  • John Briere
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 291)

Abstract

The title of this lecture is intended to have two meanings, one having to do with our sensitivity as participants in this Advanced Studies Institute (ASI) and the other having to do with the concept of sensitivity in signal detection theory and its application to the issue of memory work and recovered memories. I shall start with some comments on the former and finish up with the latter, with a discussion of research on memory suggestibility in between.

Keywords

Sexual Abuse Childhood Sexual Abuse Memory Work False Memory Childhood Trauma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Stephen Lindsay
    • 1
    • 2
  • John Briere
    • 3
  1. 1.School of PsychologyUniversity of WalesBangorUK
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of VictoriaVictoriaCanada
  3. 3.University of Southern California School of MedicineUSA

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