Wind-Generated Waves

  • Robert M. Sorensen

Abstract

The most apparent and usually the most important waves in the spectrum of waves at sea (see Figure 5.2) are those generated by the wind. Wind-generated waves are much more complex than the simple monochromatic waves considered to this point. We must briefly look into how these waves are generated by the wind and some of the important characteristics that result. It is important to have a means to quantify wind-generated waves for use in various engineering analyses. It is also important to be able to predict these waves for a given wind condition both wave hindcasts for historic wind conditions and wave forecasts for predicted impending wind conditions. Finally, we also need to look at procedures for extreme wave analysis, i.e., to predict those extreme wind-generated wave conditions that will be used as the limit for engineering design.

Keywords

Wave Height Return Period Significant Wave Height Wave Spectrum Significant Height 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. Sorensen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringLehigh UniversityBethlehemUSA

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