A Review of Empirical Studies and Applications

  • Timothy Raimond
  • David A. Hensher
Part of the Transportation Research, Economics and Policy book series (TRES)

Abstract

This chapter documents the state of practice in empirical panel data collection and application. Over sixty studies using a large number of panels are analyzed, together with a brief statement of the advantages and disadvantages of the panel approach in contrast to a single cross-section and to other longitudinal designs.

Keywords

Panel Data Transportation Research Panel Study Travel Behavior Panel Survey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Timothy Raimond
    • 1
  • David A. Hensher
    • 2
  1. 1.NSW Department of TransportTransport Data CentreSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Institute of Transport Studies, Graduate School of Business C37The University of SydneyAustralia

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