Molecular Pathogenesis of Cardiovascular Disease

  • John H. Contois
  • Juch Chin Huang
Part of the Pathology and Laboratory Medicine book series (PLM)

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major public health problem in many societies. Several types of CVD have a genetic basis or at least a genetic component. It has been estimated that about 50% of the variability of the major risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) is genetic. Environmental factors, such as diet, also influence CVD, and may in fact interact with genetic factors to modulate risk. The genes encoding the majority of structural and enzymatic proteins involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism have been cloned and characterized, permitting the use of molecular biology techniques to further our understanding of lipid and lipoprotein disorders. Coagulation factors have been implicated in thrombosis and thrombolysis, and a number of mutations and polymorphisms have been described that predispose to vascular disease. The focus of this chapter is to discuss these genetic factors related to atherosclerosis and hemostasis. The laboratory currently plays an important role in the battle against CVD by providing accurate and reliable measurement of lipids, lipoprotein cholesterols, and coagulation factors. With these important new discoveries, it is evident that the laboratory of the future will play a major role in screening, diagnosis, and treatment of familial lipoprotein abnormalities and CVD.

Keywords

Acute Myocardial Infarction Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein Familial Combine Hyperlipidemia Factor Versus Gene Arterial Thrombotic Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • John H. Contois
  • Juch Chin Huang

There are no affiliations available

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