Stomach

  • Ralph H. Hruban
  • William H. Westra
  • Timothy H. Phelps
  • Christina Isacson

Abstract

Stomach specimens come in a variety of shapes and sizes depending on the pathologic process for which the stomach is removed. For example, a small portion of stomach may be removed for peptic ulcer disease, while the entire stomach and even adjacent organs can be resected when an infiltrating cancer is present. Regardless of the specimen’s size and shape, a wise approach is to regard every stomach resection as though it potentially harbors a malignant neoplasm. Do not be betrayed by the innocent-looking ulcer. Instead, take care to evaluate the resection margins, adequately sample the lesion, and diligently search for lymph nodes. With this approach, the dissection should always be adequate, even in that rare instance when a carcinoma is incidentally discovered in a benign-appearing ulcer.

Keywords

Stomach Specimen Great Curvature Peptic Ulcer Disease Linitis Plastica Stomach Orifice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Japanese Research Society for Gastric Cancer. The general rules for the gastric study in surgery and pathology. Part I. Clinical classification. Jpn J Surg. 1981; 11: 127–139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Rotterdam H, Enterline HT, Pathology of the Stomach and Duodenum. New York, NY: Springer-Verlag, 1989.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph H. Hruban
    • 1
  • William H. Westra
    • 1
  • Timothy H. Phelps
    • 2
  • Christina Isacson
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pathology Meyer 7-181The Johns Hopkins HospitalBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Art as Applied to Medicine, School of MedicineThe Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Department of PathologyVirginia Mason Medical CenterSeattleUSA

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