Non-neoplastic Intestinal Disease

  • Ralph H. Hruban
  • William H. Westra
  • Timothy H. Phelps
  • Christina Isacson

Abstract

Proper tissue orientation is a critical part of the histologic evaluation of biopsies of the gastrointestinal tract. Tissue orientation is a two-step process that involves the coordinated actions of the endoscopist and the histotechnologist. The endoscopist should mount the biopsy mucosal side up on an appropriate solid surface (e.g., filter paper) and place it in fixative. This first step should be done immediately, in the endoscopy suite, so that the specimen does not dry out en route to the surgical pathology laboratory. The histotechnologist can then embed and cut the biopsy specimen perpendicular to the mounting surface. If the specimen is free floating, great care must be taken to identify the mucosal surface for proper embedding. Multiple sections should be cut from each tissue block for histologic evaluation. Step sections are preferred to serial sections so that intervening unstained sections are available for special stains as needed.

Keywords

Inflammatory Bowel Disease Large Intestine Focal Lesion Ileocecal Valve Distal Resection Margin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Ming SC, Goldman H, eds. Pathology of the Gastrointestinal Tract. Philadelphia, Pa: WB Saunders; 1992.Google Scholar
  2. Norris HT, ed. Pathology of the Colon, Small Intestine, and Anus. New York, NY: Churchill and Livingstone; 1983.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph H. Hruban
    • 1
  • William H. Westra
    • 1
  • Timothy H. Phelps
    • 2
  • Christina Isacson
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pathology Meyer 7-181The Johns Hopkins HospitalBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Art as Applied to Medicine, School of MedicineThe Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Department of PathologyVirginia Mason Medical CenterSeattleUSA

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