Specimen Preparation

  • David B. Williams
  • C. Barry Carter

Abstract

There are many ways to prepare specimens for the TEM. The method you choose will depend on both the type of material and the information you need to obtain. One important point to bear in mind is that your technique must not affect what you see or measure, or if it does then you must know how. Specimen preparation artifacts may be interesting but they are not usually what you want to study.

Keywords

Carbon Film Specimen Preparation Material Safety Data Sheet Carbon Replica Material Safety Data Sheet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

General References

  1. Anderson, R.M., Ed. (1990) Specimen Preparation for Transmission Electron Microscopy of Materials, II, Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings 199, MRS, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.Google Scholar
  2. Anderson, R.M., Tracy, B., and Bravman, J.C., Eds. (1992) Specimen Preparation for Transmission Electron Microscopy of Materials, III, Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings 254, MRS, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.Google Scholar
  3. Barber, D.J. (1970) J. Mater. Sci. 5, 3.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bravman, J.C., Anderson, R.M., and McDonald, M.L., Eds. (1988) Specimen Preparation for Transmission Electron Microscopy of Materials, Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings 115, MRS, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.Google Scholar
  5. Echlin, P. (1992) Low Temperature Microscopy and Analysis, Plenum Press, New York. Mainly biological but useful for polymers.Google Scholar
  6. Goodhew, P.J. (1984) Specimen Preparation for Transmission Electron Microscopy of Materials, Oxford University Press, New York.Google Scholar
  7. Goodhew, P.J. (1985) Practical Methods in Electron Microscopy, Vol. 11: Thin Foil Preparation for Electron Microscopy, Elsevier, New York.Google Scholar
  8. Hirsch, P.B., Howie, A., Nicholson, R.B., Pashley, D.W., and Whelan, M.J. (1977) Electron Microscopy of Thin Crystals,2nd edition, Krieger, Huntington, New York. Chapter 2 and Appendix 1, the largest chapter and the largest appendix.Google Scholar
  9. Humphries, D.W. (1992) The Preparation of Thin Sections of Rocks, Minerals and Ceramics, Royal Microscopical Society Handbook No. 24, Oxford University Press, New York. Although not aimed at TEM, this handbook contains many helpful ideas.Google Scholar
  10. Kestel, B.J. (1986) “Polishing Methods for Metallic and Ceramic Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies,” in ANL-80–120 Rev. 1 (from Argonne National Laboratory). 66 pages of recipes and directions which have all been extensively used by Kestel.Google Scholar
  11. Marcus, R.B. and Sheng, T.T. (1983) Transmission Electron Microscopy of Silicon VLSI Circuits and Structures, Wiley, New York.Google Scholar
  12. Reid, N. and Beesley, J.E. (1991) Practical Methods in Electron Microscopy Vol. 13: Sectioning and Crvosectioning for Electron Microscopy, Elsevier, Amsterdam. Biological but comprehensive.Google Scholar
  13. Roos, N. and Morgan, A.J. (1990) Cryoprepnration of Thin Biological Specimens for Electron Microscopy: Methods and Applications, Oxford University Press, New York. Biological again, but a good one to know.Google Scholar
  14. Sawyer, L.C. and Grubb, D.T. (1987) Polymer Microscopy,Chapman and Hall, New York. Chapter 4 is 71 pages long, covering specimen preparation for SEM and TEM; –25°10 of the book.Google Scholar
  15. Thomas, G. and Goringe, M.J. (1979) Transmission Electron Microscopy of Metals, p. 336, Wiley, New York.Google Scholar
  16. Thompson-Russell, K.C. and Edington, J.W. (1977) Electron Microscope Google Scholar
  17. Specimen Preparation Techniques in Materials Science,Macmillan, Philips Technical Library, Eindhoven, the Netherlands. Many recipes.Google Scholar

Specific References

  1. Alani. R. and Swann, P.R. (1992) in Anderson et al.,op. cit., p. 43. Barna, (1992) in Anderson etal.,op. cit., p. 254.Google Scholar
  2. Brown, J.M. and Sheng, T.J. (1988) in Bravman et al.,op. cit., p. 229.Google Scholar
  3. Cullis, A.G., Chew, N.G., and Hutchison, J.L. (1985) Ultramicroscopy 17, 303.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Goodhew, P.J. (1988) in Bravman et al.,op. cit., p. 51.Google Scholar
  5. Klepeis, S.J., Benedict, J.P., and Anderson, R.M. (1988) in Bravman et al.,op. cit., p. 179.Google Scholar
  6. Malis, T.F. (1989) in Microbeam Analysis-1989 (Ed. P.E. Russell), p. 487, San Francisco Press, San Francisco.Google Scholar
  7. Médard, L., Jacquet, D.A., and Sarlorius, R. (1949) Rev. Mat. 46, 549.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • David B. Williams
    • 1
  • C. Barry Carter
    • 2
  1. 1.Lehigh UniversityBethlehemUSA
  2. 2.University of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

Personalised recommendations