Introduction

The Application of Sociology
  • John G. Bruhn
  • Howard M. Rebach
Part of the Clinical Sociology book series (CSRP)

Abstract

In the century or so that sociology has existed, the field has gone through many changes. Perspectives, approaches, and theories have emerged and passed away. Leaders in the field have asserted that sociology should be a “pure science.” Some sociologists have emphasized quantitative approaches and the mathematical statement of theory with the objective of constructing general principles supported by data and models of social reality. Innovators have called for interpretive understanding of the social world, an exploration of subjective realities, and critical analyses of power relationships. Through it all, from Comte to Marx and Durk-heim, to the Chicago School, to the present, a common theme keeps bubbling to the surface demanding attention.

Keywords

Participatory Action Research Sociological Theory Ethical Practice Sociological Perspective Chicago School 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Abbott, M.L., & Blake, G.F. (1988). An intervention model for homeless youth. Clinical Sociology Review, 6, 148–158.Google Scholar
  2. Ackerman, N.W. (1958). The psychodynamics of family life. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  3. Anderson, C., & Rouse, L. (1988). Intervention in cases of woman battering: An application of interactionism and critical theory. Clinical Sociology Review, 6, 134–147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Babbie, E. (1983). The practice of social research, 3rd ed. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.Google Scholar
  5. Berger, PL., & Luckmann, T. (1966). The social construction of reality, a treatise in the sociology of knowledge. Garden City, NY: Doubleday.Google Scholar
  6. Billson, J.M., & Disch, E. (1991). Empowering women: A clinical sociology model for working with women in groups. In H.M. Rebach & J.G. Bruhn, (Eds.), The handbook of clinical sociology (pp. 323–344). New York: Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Brabant, S. (1993). Successful facilitation of a children’s support group when conditions are less than optimal. Clinical Sociology Review, 11, 49–60.Google Scholar
  8. Bruhn, J.G. (1987). The clinical sociologist as a health broker. Clinical Sociology Review, 5, 168–180.Google Scholar
  9. Bruhn, J.G. (1991). Ethics in clinical sociology. In H.M. Rebach & J.G. Bruhn (Eds.), The handbook of clinical sociology (pp. 99–23). New York: Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Bryan, M.E. (1992). Intervention among children of substance abusers and school success. Clinical Sociology Review, 10, 118–125.Google Scholar
  11. Bulmer, M. (1984). The Chicago school of sociology. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  12. Church, N. (1991). The effects of social change on clinical practice. In H.M. Rebach & J.G. Bruhn (Eds.), The handbook of clinical sociology (pp. 125–142). New York: Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Clark, E.J. (1990). Contemporary clinical sociology: Definitions and directions. Clinical Sociology Review, 8, 100–115.Google Scholar
  14. Collins, R. (1988). Theoretical sociology. San Diego, CA: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.Google Scholar
  15. Conger, R.D., Lorenz, F.O., Elder, G.H. Jr., Simons, R.L. & Ge, X. (1993). Husband and wife differences in response to undesirable life events. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 34, 71–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Cooley, C.H. (1924). Social organization. New York: Scribner.Google Scholar
  17. Cox, H. (1994). Presidential Address, Society for Applied Sociology: The sociologist as activist. The Journal of Applied Sociology, 10, 1–24.Google Scholar
  18. Cuthbertson-Johnson, B.A., & Gagan, R.J. (1993). The subjective dimension of a bipolar family education/support group: A sociology of emotions approach. Clinical Sociology Review, 11, 61–75.Google Scholar
  19. Dunham, H.W. (1964). Anomie and mental disorder. In M.B. Clinard (Ed.), Anomie and deviant behavior (pp. 128–157). New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  20. Dunham, H.W. (1982). Clinical Sociology: Its nature and function. Clinical Sociology Review, 1, 23–33.Google Scholar
  21. Durkheim, E. (1966). The rules of sociological method. (G.E.G. Catlin, Ed.). New York: Free Press. (Original published in 1893)Google Scholar
  22. Eisenstadt, S.N., & Helle, HJ. (Eds.) (1985). Macrosociological theory: Perspectives on sociology theory, Vol. 1. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  23. Fein, M. (1988). Resocialization: A neglected paradigm. Clinical Sociology Review, 6, 88–100.Google Scholar
  24. Fein, M. (1990a). Role change: A resocialization perspective. New York: Praeger.Google Scholar
  25. Fein, M. (1990b). Dysfunctional role maintenance. Clinical Sociology Review, 8, 87–99.Google Scholar
  26. Fein, M. (1991). Personality disorders or role negotiation problems? Clinical Sociology Review, 9, 37–47.Google Scholar
  27. Ferguson, T., Ferguson, J., & Luby, E.D. (1992). Integrating psychodynamic, cognitive, and interpersonal therapies: A biophysical role theory. Clinical Sociology Review, 10, 37–49.Google Scholar
  28. Freedman, J.A. (1982). Clinical sociology: What it is and what it isn’t—a perspective. Clinical Sociology Review, 1, 34–49.Google Scholar
  29. Fritz, J.M. (1991). The emergence of American clinical sociology. In H.M. Rebach & J.G. Bruhn (Eds.), The handbook of clinical sociology (pp. 17–30). New York: Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Gardner, H. (Ed.) (1979). Clinical Sociology Newsletter, 1, 2.Google Scholar
  31. Glass, J.E. (1992). An alternative understanding of the cognitive, emotional, and behavioral characteristics of individuals raised in alcoholic homes: A clinical theory of the individual. Clinical Sociology Review, 10, 107–117.Google Scholar
  32. Gouldner, A. (1956). Explorations in applied social science. Social Problems, 3, 169–181.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Gordon, L. (1986). The sociological expert witness in a case of collective interracial violence. Clinical Sociology Review, 4, 107–122.Google Scholar
  34. Hall, CM. (1991). Clinical sociology and religion. Clinical Sociology Review, 9, 48–58.Google Scholar
  35. Hepworth, D.H. & Larsen, J.A. (1986). Direct social work practice: Theory and skills. Chicago: Dorsey.Google Scholar
  36. Hochschild, A.R. (1979). Emotion work, feeling rules, and social structure; American Journal of Sociology, 85, 551–575.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Huber, J. (Ed.) (1991) Macro-micro linkages in sociology. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  38. Johnson, D.P. (1986). Using sociology to analyze human and organizational problems: A humanist perspective to link theory and practice. Clinical Sociology Review, 4, 57–70.Google Scholar
  39. Kammeyer, K.C.W., Ritzer, G., & Yetman, N.R. (1994). Sociology: Experiencing changing societies (6th ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.Google Scholar
  40. Knorr-Cetina, K., & Cicourel, A.V. (Eds.) (1981). Advances in social theory and methodology: Toward an integration of micro- and macro-sociologies. Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  41. Lee, A. McC. (1955). The clinical study of society. American Sociological Review, 20, 648–653.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Lennard, H.L., & Bernstein, A. (1969). Patterns in human interaction San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  43. Lorion, R.P., & Ross, J.G. (1992). Programs for change: A realistic look at the nation’s potential for preventing substance involvement among high-risk youth. Journal of Community Psychology, OSAP Special Issue, 3–9.Google Scholar
  44. Lundman, R.J. (1993). Prevention and control of juvenile delinquency. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  45. May, D., & Kelly, M.P. (1992). Understanding paranoia: Towards a social explanation. Clinical Sociology Review, 10, 50–70.Google Scholar
  46. Mead, G.H. (1934). Mind, self and society. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  47. Miller, J.S. (1985). Sociologists as mediators: Clinical sociology in action. Clinical Sociology Review, 3, 158–164.Google Scholar
  48. Mills, C.W. (1959). The sociological imagination. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  49. McDonagh, E.C. (1944). An approach to clinical sociology. Sociology and Social Research, 27, 376–383. (Reprinted in Clinical Sociology Review, 1986, 4, 14–18).Google Scholar
  50. Newman, B.M., & Newman, P.R. (1984). Development through life: A psychosocial approach. Homewood, IL: Dorsey.Google Scholar
  51. Rebach, H.M., & Brunn, J.G., (Eds.) (1991a). The handbook of clinical sociology. New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
  52. Rebach, H.M., & Bruhn, J.G., (Eds.) (1991b). Clinical sociology: Defining the field. In H.M. Rebach & J.G. Bruhn, (Eds.). The handbook of clinical sociology (pp. 3–15) New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
  53. Rebach, H.M., & Johnstone, M. (1992, May). Group treatment for the dually diagnosed. Paper presented at the 1991 Maryland Conference on Social Work Practice in Public Mental Health, Marriotsville, Maryland.Google Scholar
  54. Rosenberg, M. (1990). The self concept: Social product and social force. In M. Rosenberg & R.H. Turner (Eds.). Social psychology: Sociological perspectives. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction.Google Scholar
  55. Shibutani, T. (1961). Society and personality. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  56. Small, A. (1896). Scholarship and social agitation. The American Journal of Sociology, 1, 564–582. (Reprinted in Clinical Sociology Review, 1985, 3, 25–38.) Sociological Practice Association (1987). Ethical standards of sociological practitioners.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Stanley-Stevens, L., Yeatts, D.E., & Thibodeaux, M. (1993). The transfer of work experiences into family life: An introductory study of workers in self-managed teams. Clinical Sociology Review, 11, 76–92.Google Scholar
  58. Stephenson, K. (1994). Diversity: A managerial paradox. Clinical Sociology Review, 12, 175–188.Google Scholar
  59. Stoecker, R., & Beckwith, D. (1992). Advancing Toledo’s neighborhood movement through participatory research: Integrating activist and academic approaches. Clinical Sociology Review, 10, 198–213.Google Scholar
  60. Straus, R. (1982). Clinical sociology on the one-to-one level: A social behavioral approach to counseling. Clinical Sociology Review, 1, 59–74.Google Scholar
  61. Straus, R. (1984). Changing the definition of the situation: Toward a theory of sociological intervention. Clinical Sociology Review, 2, 51–63.Google Scholar
  62. Swan, L.A. (1984). The practice of clinical sociology and sociotherapy. Cambridge, MA: Schenkman.Google Scholar
  63. Swan, L.A. (1988). Grounded encounter therapy: Its characteristics and process. Clinical Sociology Review, 6, 76–87.Google Scholar
  64. Thoresen, J.H. (1993). The sociologist as expert witness. Clinical Sociology Review, 11, 109–122.Google Scholar
  65. Thornton, W.E., & Voigt, L. (1988). The roles and ethics of the practicing criminologist. Clinical Sociology Review, 6, 113–133.Google Scholar
  66. Van der Merwe, H.W., & Odendaal, A. (1991). Constructive conflict intervention in South Africa: Some lessons. Clinical Sociology Review, 9, 71–86.Google Scholar
  67. Volkart, E.H. (Ed.) (1951). Social behavior and personality. New York: Social Science Research Council.Google Scholar
  68. Watts, W.D. (1989). Reducing adolescent drug abuse: Sociological strategies for community practice. Clinical Sociology Review, 7, 152–171.Google Scholar
  69. Watts, W.D., & Wright, N.B. (1991). Drug abuse prevention: Clinical sociology in the community. In H.M. Rebach & J.G. Bruhn (Eds.), The handbook of clinical sociology (pp. 363–381). New York: Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Watzlawick, P., Beavin, J.H., & Jackson, D.D. (1967). Pragmatics of human communication. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  71. Watzlawick, P. (1990). Munchhausens pigtail or psychotherapy and “reality.” New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  72. Wirth, L. (1931). Sociology and clinical procedure. The American Journal of Sociology, 37, 49–66. (Reprinted in Clinical Sociology Review, (1982) 1, 7–22.)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Wolf, S., & Bruhn, J.G. (1992). The power of clan: The influence of human relationships on heart disease. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction.Google Scholar

Recommended Readings

  1. Anderson, C, & Rouse, L. (1988). Intervention in cases of woman battering: An application of interactionism and critical theory. Clinical Sociology Review, 6, 134–147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Fein, M. (1990). Role Change: A Resocialization Perspective. New York: Praeger.Google Scholar
  3. Johnson, D.P. (1986). Using sociology to analyze human and organizational problems: A humanist perspective to link theory and practice. Clinical Sociology Review, 4, 57–70.Google Scholar
  4. Stoecker, R., & Beckwith, D. (1992). Advancing Toledo’s neighborhood movement through participa­tory research: Integrating activist and academic approaches. Clinical Sociology Review, 10,198–213.Google Scholar
  5. Watzlawick, P. (1990). Munchhausen’s Pigtail or Psychotherapy and “Reality.” New York: Norton.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • John G. Bruhn
    • 1
  • Howard M. Rebach
    • 2
  1. 1.Pennsylvania State University / HarrisburgMiddletownUSA
  2. 2.University of Maryland, Eastern ShorePrincess AnneUSA

Personalised recommendations