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Social Organization in the Aye-Aye (Daubentonia Madagascariensis) and the Perceived Distinctiveness of Nocturnal Primates

  • Eleanor J. Sterling
  • Alison F. Richard
Chapter

Abstract

Nocturnal species have typically received cursory attention in comparative analyses of primate social organization, and it has been assumed that their social organization is both less complex and more homogeneous than that of diurnal forms (e.g. Charles-Dominique and Martin, 1970; Martin, 1972; Charles-Dominique, 1977; Eisenberg, 1981; Fleagle, 1988). This assumption seems to have more to do with the difficulty of seeing the interactions of nocturnal species than with empirical evidence of qualitative differences in complexity. The difficulty arises partly from observation conditions at night, and partly from the fact that the interactants are often displaced from each other in space and time.

Keywords

Home Range Estrous Female Vocal Repertoire Nocturnal Species Diurnal Species 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eleanor J. Sterling
    • 1
    • 2
  • Alison F. Richard
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyYale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.Deutches PrimatenzentrumGöttingenGermany

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