Pigment Grinding Using Waterborne Acrylic Resin/Polyester Polymer Blends: Part-B

  • Mahendra K. Sharma
  • Hieu D. Phan
Chapter

Abstract

Several waterborne acrylic resin/polyester polymer blends were used for grinding pigments (e.g. millbases) for different applications such as waterborne inks, coatings and paints. Commercially available pigments contained mostly acrylic resins as a grinding vehicle. These pigments usually exhibited a limited applications with polyesters, when used as a binder in waterborne coating and ink formulations. In order to form compatible millbases, the pigments were ground with acrylic/polyester blends. It was found that the pigment millbases prepared with acrylic resin/polyester blends could be used with the acrylic polymers and/or polyester polymers in formulating waterborne coatings, paints and inks. The film properties of these waterborne coatings and inks were excellent. The water resistance of the film on paper, aluminum foil and polymer substrates was superior than that of the film containing polyester alone. The blocking temperature for film containing polymer blends was 20 – 30°F higher than that of the polyester containing films.

Keywords

Acrylic Resin Water Resistance Polymer Blend Acrylic Polymer Pigment Dispersion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mahendra K. Sharma
    • 1
  • Hieu D. Phan
    • 1
  1. 1.Research LaboratoriesEastman Chemical CompanyKingsportUSA

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