A Survey of Adaptive Single Channel Interference Rejection Techniques for Wireless Communications

  • J. D. Laster
  • J. H. Reed
Chapter
Part of the The Springer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science book series (SECS, volume 309)

Abstract

Tremendous growth in wireless communications has greatly increased loading of the spectrum. Spectrum loading translates into a higher likelihood of users interfering with one another. Interference rejection techniques provide a means of minimizing this multi-user interference, allowing greater usage of available spectrum.

This survey paper focuses on single-channel techniques for interference rejection (that is, techniques employing one antenna) as opposed to multi-channel techniques (which utilize arrays or crosspolarized antennas). Implementation papers are deemphasized in this survey since techniques constitute the main interest. The paper divides interference rejection techniques for digital modulation into spread spectrum techniques and non-spread spectrum techniques.

Spread spectrum categories include direct sequence (DS), code division multiple access (CDMA), and frequency hopping (FH). DS techniques focus on rejection of narrowband interference and include whitening filters (i.e., adaptive notch fiilters), decision feedback fiilters, and adaptive A/D conversion. Some CDMA techniques employ interference estimation-and-subtraction from the signal-of-interest, while others exploit spectral correlation properties. FH techniques apply whitening filters and make use of the transient nature of the hopping signal. Non-spread spectrum techniques include the constant modulus algorithm, neural networks, non-linear filters, and time-varying filters that use spectral correlation properties.

Keywords

Little Mean Square Adaptive Filter Interference Cancellation Little Mean Square Algorithm Decision Feedback 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. D. Laster
    • 1
  • J. H. Reed
    • 1
  1. 1.Mobile and Portable Radio Research Group, Bradley Department of Electrical EngineeringVirginia Polytechnic Institute & State UniversityBlacksburgUSA

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