Fundamentals of Lossy Video Compression

  • Vasudev Bhaskaran
  • Konstantinos Konstantinides
Part of the The Springer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science book series (SECS, volume 334)

Abstract

In the previous chapter, we introduced some of the basic concepts in the theory of lossy compression of still-images. These concepts can be readily applied to the compression of image sequences (such as video) as well, by simply treating each image in the sequence as a still-image. This approach is inherently simple; however, it does not provide significant compression. For instance, consider an uncompressed image sequence at a data rate of 166 Mbits per second. Using a DCT-based coding system on an image-by-image basis, for good image fidelity, one can achieve close to 12:1 data compression. Thus, the compressed bit rate is close to 14 Mbits per second, which is too high for most practical uses. For instance, the bandwidth for digital TV broadcasting is close to 4 to 6 Mbits per second. In this case, we need a compression ratio around 41:1. In another example, the typical output rate of a CD-ROM drive is close to 1.5 Mbits per second. In this case, we need a compression ratio around 110:1. Hence, in practical applications with image sequences we require at least four times better compression ratios than those we can achieve with coders for still-images.

Keywords

Search Location Motion Vector Motion Estimation Video Code Motion Compensation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vasudev Bhaskaran
    • 1
  • Konstantinos Konstantinides
    • 1
  1. 1.Hewlett-Packard LaboratoriesUSA

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