Current-Mode Continuous-Time Filters

  • David J. Allstot
  • Rajesh H. Zele

Abstract

A low-voltage high-frequency CMOS fully-balanced filtering technique is presented. The low internal voltage characteristic of current-mode circuits allows the operation at power supply voltages as low as 3-V with high dynamic range. The integrator time-constant is determined by a MOSFET small-signal transconductance and an additional non-critical MOSFET gate capacitance. For ladder filters derived from doubly-terminated LC prototypes, HSPICE simulations predict a -3-dB bandwidth of 125 MHz for a three-pole lowpass filter. Power dissipation is 6 mW/pole with a 3-V power supply.

Keywords

Negative Input Small Signal Model Output Conductance HSPICE Simulation Chebyshev Filter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • David J. Allstot
    • 1
  • Rajesh H. Zele
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringCarnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA

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