Conceptual and Theoretical Basis of Landscape Ecology as a Human Ecosystem Science

  • Zev Naveh
  • Arthur S. Lieberman

Abstract

Having traced the development of landscape ecology as a scientific discipline in Central Europe, we shall now attempt to outline its conceptual and epistemological framework. In our view, this is derived from the following closely connected scientific theories.

Keywords

Landscape Ecology Living System Negative Feedback Loop System Concept Human System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zev Naveh
    • 1
  • Arthur S. Lieberman
    • 2
  1. 1.The Lowdermilk Faculty of Agricultural EngineeringTechnion-Israel Institute of TechnologyTechnion City, HaifaIsrael
  2. 2.Cornell Abroad Program in IsraelUniversity of HaifaMount Carmel, HaifaIsrael

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