Alcohol Problems

  • Linda C. Sobell
  • Tony Toneatto
  • Mark B. Sobell
  • Jennifer-Ann Shillingford

Abstract

Many people experience problems related to their use of alcohol. These problems can be quite diverse, including, for example, accidents, family conflicts, impaired work performance, and cirrhosis of the liver. Whatever their nature, alcohol problems impose a heavy burden on society. It has been estimated that the cost of alcohol problems in the United States in 1990 was $136.3 billion (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 1990). The costs occur in a wide range of domains, such as excessive morbidity and mortality, lost productivity at work, and disrupted families .

Keywords

Alcohol Abuser Alcohol Dependence Nicotine Dependence Alcohol Problem Problem Drinker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda C. Sobell
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Tony Toneatto
    • 1
    • 3
  • Mark B. Sobell
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jennifer-Ann Shillingford
    • 4
  1. 1.Addiction Research FoundationTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Department of Behavioural ScienceUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  4. 4.Toronto General HospitalTorontoCanada

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