Hospital and Nursing Information Systems

  • Kathryn J. Hannah
  • Marion J. Ball
  • Margaret J. A. Edwards
Part of the Computers in Health Care book series (HI)

Abstract

Literature clearly shows the contributions of nursing informatics to the practice of nursing and to patient care. Originally, the nurse’s role was that of a consumer of developments in medical informatics. The early developments in medical informatics and their advantages to nursing have been thoroughly documented (Hannah, 1976; Chapter 1, this volume). These initial developments were individual standalone systems for such tasks as automated charting of nurses’ notes, automated nursing care plans, automated patient monitoring, automated personnel time assignment, nursing workload measurement systems and gathering of epidemiological and administrative statistics. More recently, an integrated approach to health informatics has resulted in the development and marketing of sophisticated hospital information systems. Nurses form the largest group of health care professionals in any institution having a computerized hospital information system. While carrying out the managerial aspects of patient care, a nurse accesses a computerized hospital information system more often than any other health care professional.

Keywords

National Health Service Decision Support System Nursing Care Nursing Practice Hospital Information System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Abdeliah, F.G. (1988). Future directions: Refining, implementing, testing, and evaluating the Nursing Minimum Data Set. In H.H. Werley & N.M. Lang (Eds.), Identification of the Nursing Minimum Data Se. (pp. 416–426). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  2. Beyers, M., Donaho, B., & Laubenthal, R.M. (1988). Essential elements for the Nursing Minimum Data Set as seen by the joint commission on accreditation of hospitals. In H.H. Werley & N.M. Lang (Eds.), Identification of the Nursing Minimum Data Se. (pp. 251–259). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  3. Brennan, P.F. 1985. “Decision support for nursing practice: The chal­lenge and the promise.” In K.J. Hannah, E.J. Guillemin & D.N. Conklin (eds.) Nursing Uses of Computer and Information Science. North-Holland: Elsevier Science Publishers. 315–319.Google Scholar
  4. Bryant, J.R. (1988). The standardisation of data definition in the United Kingdom. In A.R. Bakker, M.J. Ball, J.R. Scherrer, & J.L. Willems (Eds.), Towards New Hospital Information System. (pp. 309–313). North-Holland: Elsevier Science.Google Scholar
  5. Campbell, C. 1978. Nursing Diagnosis and Nursing Intervention. New York: John Wiley and Sons.Google Scholar
  6. Devine, E.C. (1988). The Nursing Minimum Data Set: Benefits and im­plications for nurse researchers. In National League for Nursing, Perspectives in Nursing 1987–198. (pp. 115–118). New York: National League for Nursing.Google Scholar
  7. Department of Health and Human Services. (1985). 1984 revision of the Uniform Hospital Discharge Data Set. Federal registe., 50 (147), pp. 31038–31040.Google Scholar
  8. Edwardson, S.R., & Giovannetti, P.B. (1987). A review of cost-accounting methods for nursing services. Nursing Economics. (pp. 107–117).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Feigenbaum, E.A. and McCorduck, P. (1983). The Fifth Generation. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
  10. Fry and Sibley. 1976. “Evolution of data-base management systems.” ACM Computing Surveys, (1).Google Scholar
  11. Gallant, B.J. (1988). Data requirements for the Nursing Minimum Data Set as seen by nurse administrators. In H.H. Werley & N.M. Lang (Eds.), Identification of the Nursing Minimum Data Se. (pp. 165–176). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  12. Giovannetti, P. (1987). Implications of Nursing Minimum Data Set. In K.J. Hannah, M. Reimer, W.C. Mills, & S. Letourneau (Eds.), Cli­nical judgement and decision making: The future with nursing diagno­si. (pp. 552–555). New York: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
  13. Graves, J.R., & Corcoran, S. (1989). The study of nursing informatics. Image, 2., pp. 227–231.Google Scholar
  14. Halloran, E.J. (1988). Conceptual considerations, decision criteria, and guidelines for the Nursing Minimum Data Set from an administrative perspective. In H.H. Werley & N.M. Lang (Eds.), Identification of the Nursing Minimum Data Se. (pp. 48–66). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  15. Hannah, K.J. 1976. “The computer and nursing practice.” Nursing Outlook, 2.(9): 555–558.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Johnson, M. (1989). Perspectives on costing nursing. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 1.(1), pp. 65–71.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Kraegel, J.M. (1988). Potential impact of the Nursing Minimum Data Set on the development of health policy: Public and private. In H.H. Werley & N.M. Lang (Eds.), Identification of the Nursing Minimum Data Se. (pp. 370–379). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  18. Lant, T.W. (1988). Use of the Nursing Minimum Data Set to determine nursing care cost. In H.H. Werley & N.M. Lang (Eds.), Identification of the Nursing Minimum Data Se. (pp. 325–333). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  19. Mailbusch, R.M. (1988). The Nursing Minimum Data Set: Benefits and implications for clinical nurses. In National League for Nursing, Perspectives in Nursing 1987–198. (pp. 127–131). New York: National League for Nursing.Google Scholar
  20. McCloskey, J.C. (1988). The Nursing Minimum Data Set: Benefits and implications for nurse educators. In National League for Nursing, Perspectives in Nursing 1987–198. (pp. 119–126). New York: National League for Nursing.Google Scholar
  21. McCormick, K.A. (1988). A unified nursing language system. In M.J. Ball, K.J. Hannah, U. Gerdin Jelger, & H. Peterson (Eds.), Nursing informatics: Where caring and technology mee. (pp. 168–178). New York: Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  22. McHugh, M. & Schultz, S. 1982. “Computer technology in hospital nursing departments: Future applications and implications.” In Proceedings-Sixth Annual Symposium on Computer Applications in Medical Car., edited by B.I. Blum. Los Angeles: IEEE, 557–561.Google Scholar
  23. McPhillips, R. (1988). Essential elements for the Nursing Minimum Data Set as seen by federal officials. In H.H. Werley & N.M. Lang (Eds.), Identification of the Nursing Minimum Data Se. (pp. 233–238). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  24. Murnaghan, J.H. (1978). Uniform basic data sets for health statistical systems. International Journal of Epidemiolog., 7, pp. 263–269.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Murnaghan, J.H., & White, K.L. (1970). Hospital Discharge Data: Report of the conference on hospital discharge abstracts systems. Medical Care, 8 (Suppl.), pp. 1–215.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. National Center for Health Statistics. (1972). Uniform hospital abstract: Minimum basic data set. Vital and Health Statistics, 4(14., (DHEW Publication No. HSM 73–1451). Washington: US Government Printing.Google Scholar
  27. National Center for Health Statistics. (1980). Uniform hospital discharge data: Minimum data set. (DHEW Publication No. PHS 80–1157). Hyattsville: Author.Google Scholar
  28. National Health Service/Department of Health and Social Security Steering Group on Health Services Information. (1982). Steering group on health services information: First report to the secretary of state. London: Author.Google Scholar
  29. National Health Service/Department of Health and Social Security Steering Group on Health Services Information. (1984a). Steering group on health services information: Second report to the secretary of state. London: Author.Google Scholar
  30. National Health Service/Department of Health and Social Security Steering Group on Health Services Information. (1984b). Steering group on health services information: Third report to the secretary of state. London: Author.Google Scholar
  31. National Health Service/Department of Health and Social Security Steering Group on Health Services Information. (1984c). Steering group on health services information: Fourth report to the secretary of state. London: Author.Google Scholar
  32. National Health Service/Department of Health and Social Security Steering Group on Health Services Information. (1984d). Steering group on health services information: Fifth report to the secretary of state. London: Author.Google Scholar
  33. National Health Service/Department of Health and Social Security Steering Group on Health Services Information. (1984e). Steering group on health services information: Sixth report to the secretary of state. London: Author.Google Scholar
  34. Pearce, N.D. (1988). Uniform minimum health data sets: Concept, development, testing, recognition for federal health use, and current status. In H.H. Werley & N.M. Lang (Eds.), Identification of the Nursing Minimum Data Se. (pp. 122–132). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  35. Rosenblum, R.W., & Maloney-Krukar, D. (1988). The Nursing Minimum Data Set from the perspective of public and private payers. In H.H. Werley & N.M. Lang (Eds.), Identification of the Nursing Minimum Data Se. (pp. 260–279). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  36. Sonnenberg, F.A. and Pauker, S.G. (1986). Decision Maker 6.0. In R. Solamon, B. Blum, and M. Jorgensen (Eds.) Proceedings of Medinfo ′86. Amsterdam: North Holland.Google Scholar
  37. Stefanchik, Michael F. (1987). Point-of-Care Information Systems: Improving Patient Care. Computers in Health Car. (February).Google Scholar
  38. Werley, H.H. (1988a). Introduction to the Nursing Minimum Data Set and its development. In H.H. Werley & N.M. Lang (Eds.), Identification of the Nursing Minimum Data Se. (pp. 1–15). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  39. Werley, H.H. (1988b). Research directions. In H.H. Werley & N.M. Lang (Eds.), Identification of the Nursing Minimum Data Se. (pp. 427–431). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  40. Werley, H.H., Devine, E.C., & Zorn, C.R. (1988). Nursing needs its own minimum data set. American Journal of Nursing, 8., pp. 1651–1653.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  41. Werley, H.H., Devine, E.C., Zorn, C.R., Ryan, P., & Westra, B.L. (1991). The Nursing Minimum Data Set: Abstraction tool for standardized, comparable, essential data. American Journal of Public Health, 8., pp. 421–426.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Werley, H.H., & Lang, N.M. (1988). The consensually derived Nursing Minimum Data Set: Elements and definitions. In H.H. Werley & N.M. Lang (Eds.), Identification of the Nursing Minimum Data Se. (pp. 402–411). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  43. Werley, H.H., & Zorn, C.R. (1988). The Nursing Minimum Data Set: Benefits and implications. In National League for Nursing, Perspectives in Nursin. — 1987–198. (pp. 105–114). New York: National League for Nursing.Google Scholar
  44. Wheeler, M. (1991). Nurses do count. Nursing Time., 57(16), pp. 64–65.Google Scholar
  45. Youngblut, R. (1991). Hospital Medical Records Institute (HMRI). National Health Information Counci., 2(1), p. 10.Google Scholar
  46. Zielstorff, R.D. (1984). Why aren’t there more significant automated Nursing Information Systems? The Journal of Nursing Administration, 1., pp. 7–10.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Bibliography

  1. Barry, C.Y., & Gibbons, L.K. (1990). Information systems technology: Barriers and challenges to implementation. Journal Of Nursing Administration, 20(2., pp. 40–42.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bulechek, G.M., & McCloskey, J.C (1990). Nursing interventions: Taxonomy development. In J.C. McCloskey & H.K. Grace (Eds.), Current issues in nursin. (3rd ed., pp. 23–28). St. Louis: Mosby.Google Scholar
  3. Devine, E.C., & Werley, H.H. (1988). Test of the Nursing Minimum Data Set: Availability of data and reliability. 2Research in Nursing and Health, 11, pp. 97–104.Google Scholar
  4. Dowling, A.F. (1988). Considerations for data set development: Planning for future needs and the nature of the information. In H.H. Werley & N.M. Lang (Eds.), Identification of the Nursing Minimum Data Se. (pp. 177–189). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  5. Grobe, S.J. (1990). Nursing intervention lexicon and taxonomy study: Language and classification methods. Advances in Nursing Science, 1., pp. 22–33.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Hannah, K.J. (1991). The need for health data linkage hospital/ institutional needs a nursing statement. In Hospital Medical Records Institute, Papers and recommendations from the national workshop on health care data linkag. (pp. 17–18). Don Mills: Hospital Medical Records Institute.Google Scholar
  7. Jenny, J. (1989). Classifying nursing diagnoses: A self care approach. Nursing and Health Care, 1.(2), pp. 82–88.Google Scholar
  8. Lang, N.M., & Marek, K.D. (1990). The classification of patient outcomes. Journal of Professional Nursin., 6, pp. 158–163.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Management Information Systems Project. (1985). Guidelines for management information systems in Canadian health care facilities: Frameworks and function.. Ottawa: Author.Google Scholar
  10. Martin, K. (1982). A client classification system adaptable for computerization. Nursing Outlook, 3., pp. 515–517.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. McCloskey, J.C., Bulechek, G.M., Cohen, M.Z., Craft, M.J., Crossley, J.D., Denehy, J.A., Glick, O.J., Kruckeberg, T., Mass, M., Prophet, C.M., & Tripp-Reimer, T. (1990). Classification of nursing interventions. Journal of Professional Nursing., pp. 151–157.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. National Task Force on Health Information. (1990, November). An opportunity to renew Canada’s health information systems. Unpublished manuscript.Google Scholar
  13. National Task Force on Health Information. (1991). Health information for Canada. Ottawa: National Health Information Council.Google Scholar
  14. Werley, H.H., & Zorn, C.R. (1989). The Nursing Minimum Data Set and its relationship to classifications for nursing practice. In Cabinet on Nursing Practice, Classification systems for describing nursing practice: Working paper. (pp. 50–54). Kansas City: American Nurses’ Association.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathryn J. Hannah
    • 1
  • Marion J. Ball
    • 2
  • Margaret J. A. Edwards
    • 3
  1. 1.Information Management Consulting Branch, Information Technology DivisionAlberta HealthEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Information ServicesUniversity of MarylandBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Margaret J. A. Edwards and Associates Inc.CalgaryCanada

Personalised recommendations