Research Directions Related to Child Abuse and Neglect

  • Roy C. Herrenkohl
Chapter

Abstract

Future directions for research on child abuse and neglect depend on goals for the general area and the role to be played by research in achieving these goals. The goals proposed here are to provide: (1) treatment to abusive families to reduce or remove the likelihood of recurrence, and (2) services to abused children to ameliorate the consequences of abuse and to develop prevention strategies to reduce its incidence. The role of research in meeting these objectives is to obtain information about the incidence and prevalence of abuse, to examine its causes, and to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment and prevention.

Keywords

Sexual Abuse Child Abuse Research Direction Child Sexual Abuse Physical Abuse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roy C. Herrenkohl
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Social ResearchLehigh UniversityBethlehemUSA

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