Synthetic Peptide Representing a T-Cell Epitope of CRM197 Substitutes as Carrier Molecule in a Haemophilus Influenzae Type B (HIB) Conjugate Vaccine

  • Garvin S. BixlerJr.
  • Ronald Eby
  • Kathy M. Dermody
  • Robert M. Woods
  • Robert C. Seid
  • Subramonia Pillai

Abstract

The cross-reactive material (CRM197) of diphtheria toxin is considered to be advantageous as a carrier molecule in the formulation of a Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine. In order to more precisely understand the function of the CRM197 in the vaccine, we have begun mapping the T-cell epitopes of the protein. A peptide which represents a segment of the primary sequence of CRM197 has been identified and found to stimulate diphtheria toxoid or CRM197-primed murine T-lymphocytes. In addition, the peptide is capable of priming T-cells in vivo for a subsequent in vitro T-cell response to itself or to the intact CRM197 molecule. The ability of the peptide to replace CRM197 as a carrier molecule was examined by immunizing mice with PRP, PRP-CRM197 conjugate, or PRP covalently coupled to the peptide. Antibodies to PRP were only detected in the PRP-CRM197 or PRP-peptide immunized groups. Both conjugates elicited primary and secondary antibody responses. Thus, a synthetic peptide representing a defined T-cell epitope of CRM197 has been functionally demonstrated based on its ability to act as a carrier molecule in a PRP conjugate vaccine.

Keywords

Haemophilus Influenzae Conjugate Vaccine Capsular Polysaccharide Diphtheria Toxin Carrier Molecule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Garvin S. BixlerJr.
    • 1
  • Ronald Eby
    • 1
  • Kathy M. Dermody
    • 1
  • Robert M. Woods
    • 1
  • Robert C. Seid
    • 1
  • Subramonia Pillai
    • 1
  1. 1.Praxis Biologics, Inc.RochesterUSA

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