Nephrotoxicity pp 183-187 | Cite as

Comparative Uptake and Lysosomal Phospholipidosis Induced by Gentamicin Components C1, C1a, and C2

  • M. B. Carlier
  • B. Rollmann
  • P. Maldague
  • P. M. Tulkens
  • Z. Kallay

Abstract

Aminoglycosides are nephrotoxic and this adverse effect has triggered many efforts towards the design and/or the screening of less toxic derivatives (see Price, 1986 for a recent review). Yet, the first broad-spectrum and still widely used aminoglycoside, gentamicin, is not a pure substance and is actually commercialized as a mixture of three main components, C1, C1a and C2, which differ by the methylation of the N6 and C6 atoms in the 2’,6’ diaminosugar moiety. Surprisingly enough, little information is available concerning the relative nephrotoxicities of these components. Whereas some reports suggest that gentamicin C1 induces less nephrotoxicity than gentamicin complex in humans (see e.g., Mossegaard et al., 1975) , others failed to substantiate such difference (e.g., Forrey et al., 1978). Kohlepp et al. (1984) showed in a comparative study in rats that gentamicin C2 and gentamicin C1a are more nephrotoxic than gentamicin C1 at an equivalent, high dosage (40 mg/kg). The uptake of gentamicin complex by rat kidney cortex, however, is saturable, with an apparent Km in a 10–20 mg/k serum concentration range (Gauliano et al., 1986).

Keywords

Kidney Cortex Complicated Urinary Tract Infection Renal Accumulation Comparative Uptake Total Lipid Phosphorus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. B. Carlier
    • 1
  • B. Rollmann
    • 1
  • P. Maldague
    • 1
  • P. M. Tulkens
    • 1
  • Z. Kallay
    • 2
  1. 1.Lab. de Chimie Physiologique and International Institute of Cellular and Molecular PathologyLab. d’Analyse des Medicamentsf Laboratoire de Cytologie et Pathologie Experimentales Universite Catholique de LouvainBruxellesBelgium
  2. 2.Institute of Experimental PharmacologySlovak Academy of SciencesBratislavaCzechoslovakia

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