The Aqueous Conformation and Solubility of Polyvinylpyrrolidone in Relation to the Use of Polymers in Oil Recovery

  • Philip Molyneux
Chapter

Abstract

Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) (monomer-unit structure [I]) is a water-soluble synthetic polymer which is stable physically and chemically in aqueous solution (1–3), and which is commercially available in a diversity of molecular weight grades (4). From these features alone, PVP has potential for use in oil-recovery and related applications; similarly, its monomer unit has potential as a component of copolymers tailored for these applications (5). In any such applications, it is important not only that the polymer remains in solution under all conditions of temperature, pressure and salinity that may be encountered, but that its solutions also retain the desired rheological behavior. Ensuring that this happens, especially with novel copolymers, requires that we have a good understanding of the molecular interactions which occur in these aqueous polymer systems.

Keywords

Carbon Capture Trisodium Phosphate Coso Lute Aranatic Compound Molecular Weight Grade 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip Molyneux
    • 1
  1. 1.Macrophile AssociatesLondonUK

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