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Long Term Human Placental Lobule Perfusion — An Ultrastructural Study

  • P. Anthony di Sant’Agnese
  • Karen L. de Mesy Jensen
  • Patrick J. Wier
  • Debabrata Maulik
  • Richard K. Miller
Chapter
Part of the Trophoblast Research book series (TR)

Abstract

The importance of the ultrastructural evaluation of perfused placental tissue was first emphasized by Panigel (1965, 1971). Ultrastructural study of perfused tissue is now generally accepted as mandatory. Several recent publications have addressed the issue of placental ultrastructural changes after in vitro dual perfusion (Contractor et al., 1984; Illsley et al., 1985; Kaufmann, 1985). These studies involved placental tissue evaluated after only 2–4 hr of perfusion. In this paper we present high resolution light microscopic and electron microscopic findings of placental lobules dually perfused for up to 12 hr. There was excellent overall preservation of morphology. Biochemical and physiological evaluations were also performed demonstrating viability throughout the perfusion period.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Anthony di Sant’Agnese
    • 1
  • Karen L. de Mesy Jensen
    • 1
  • Patrick J. Wier
    • 2
    • 3
  • Debabrata Maulik
    • 2
  • Richard K. Miller
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Departments of Pathology and Laboratory MedicineUniversity of Rochester Medical CenterRochesterUSA
  2. 2.Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of Rochester Medical CenterRochesterUSA
  3. 3.Radiation Biology and BiophysicsUniversity of Rochester Medical CenterRochesterUSA

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