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Criteria for Standardizing and Judging Viability Placental Perfusions in Animals

A Workshop Report
  • Bruce J. Kelman
  • Bernard K. van Kreel
Chapter
Part of the Trophoblast Research book series (TR)

Abstract

The recommendations in this manuscript are derived from a workshop which was held on October 7, 1985. In addition to input supplied by the participants, a number of articles published between 1967 and 1985 were examined for trends in criteria reported. These articles did not comprise an exhaustive literature search; rather they represented a very selective survey. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe criteria which the participants felt should used to determine the viability of placentae during perfusions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce J. Kelman
    • 1
  • Bernard K. van Kreel
    • 2
  1. 1.Biology and Chemistry DepartmentBattelle Pacific Northwest LaboratoriesRichlandUSA
  2. 2.Department of Chemical PathologyErasmus UniversityRotterdamThe Netherlands

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