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Placental Steroid Dehydrogenases: Assessment with a Nonhuman Primate in Situ Placental Perfusion Model

  • William SlikkerJr.
  • John R. Bailey
  • George W. Lipe
  • Zelda Althaus
  • Julian E. A. Leakey
Chapter
Part of the Trophoblast Research book series (TR)

Abstract

The oxidoreductase activity of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) has been demonstrated in human placenta and catalyzes the interconversion of estradiol-17β (E2) and estrone (E1) (Langer and Engel, 1958; Jarabak and Sack, 1969; Strickler and Tobias, 1982). Preimplantation rat and mouse embryos have also been reported to possess 17β-HSD activity (Wu and Lin, 1982; Wu and Matsumoto, 1985). It has been postulated that 17β-HSD is responsible for the conversion of the potent estrogen, E2, to the less potent E1 in later-term non-human primate pregnancy (Slikker et al., 1982a) and regulates the ratio of E2 and E1 throughout the preimplantation period in the rodent (Wu and Matsumoto, 1985).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • William SlikkerJr.
    • 1
  • John R. Bailey
    • 1
    • 2
  • George W. Lipe
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zelda Althaus
    • 1
    • 2
  • Julian E. A. Leakey
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Pharmacodynamics Branch, Reproductive and Developmental ToxicologyNational Center for Toxicological ResearchJeffersonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Pharmacology and Interdisciplinary ToxicologyUniversity of Arkansas for Medical SciencesLittle RockUSA

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