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Monoclonal Antibodies to Equine Trophoblast

  • Douglas F. Antczak
  • J. Clare Poleman
  • Laura M. Stenzler
  • Stephen G. Volsen
  • W. R. Allen
Chapter
Part of the Trophoblast Research book series (TR)

Abstract

The equine trophoblast exists in two distinct forms. The non-invasive and major component constitutes the outer layer of the allantochorionic villi that interdigitate with the endometrial epithelium. The invasive and minor component consists of the chorionic girdle. This discrete, annulare band of tissue begins to differentiate at approximately day 25 of gestation, and it invades the endometrium between days 36 and 38 to form 10-20 endometrial cups (Allen et al., 1973). The large cells from the fetal endometrial cups secrete the high concentrations of equine Chorionic Gonadotrophin (eCG) that are present in the serum of pregnant mares between days 40 and 120. The cup cells also elicit a maternal cell mediated reaction which hastens the destruction of the cups and their deliverance from the endometrium between days 100 and 140. No such leukocyte reaction occurs at the interface between the endometrial epithelium and the normal trophoblast of the allantochorion (Allen, 1975).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas F. Antczak
    • 1
    • 3
  • J. Clare Poleman
    • 1
  • Laura M. Stenzler
    • 1
  • Stephen G. Volsen
    • 2
  • W. R. Allen
    • 2
  1. 1.James A. Baker Institute for Animal HealthNew York State College of Veterinary Medicine Cornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  2. 2.Thoroughbred Breeders’ Association Equine FertilityUnit Animal Research StationCambridgeUK
  3. 3.James A. Baker Institute of Animal HealthNYS College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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