Cardiology pp 657-670 | Cite as

Cardiovascular Disease in Developing Countries Rheumatic Heart Disease

  • S. Padmavati
  • Vineeta Vishvbandhu
  • Vijay Gupta
  • K. Prakash

Abstract

Since World War II, published literature points to a high prevalence of RHD in developing countries, which contribute to two thirds of the world population. Rheumatic heart disease is the commonest type in children and adolescents and one of the most frequent in adults. For many parts of Latin America (Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Guatemala, Mexico, Panama, Peru), the West Indies, in the Middle East (Algeria, Cyprus, Egypt, Morocco, Sudan), in Ethiopia, Nigeria, Senegal, Iran, Pakistan, India, Burma, Hongkong, Indonesia, Thailand, Sri Lanka and Mongolia this holds true1.

Keywords

Rheumatic Fever Rheumatic Heart Disease Primary Prophylaxis Streptococcal Infection Primary Health Care Center 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Padmavati
    • 1
  • Vineeta Vishvbandhu
    • 2
  • Vijay Gupta
    • 2
  • K. Prakash
    • 3
  1. 1.National Heart InstituteNew DelhiIndia
  2. 2.Research OfficerAll India Heart FoundationNew DelhiIndia
  3. 3.Dept. of MicrobiologyLady Hardinge Medical CollegeNew DelhiIndia

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