Occupational Health Problems of the Rural Work Force

  • Cornelia F. Mutel
  • Kelley J. Donham

Abstract

Just as rural was historically synonymous with farm, so the rural worker commonly is thought of as a farmer. However, the number of persons employed in agriculture has been steadily decreasing. This decrease has been paralleled by a continuing diversification of rural employment possibilities, resulting from the decentralization of American manufacturing and the movement of many plants to rural locations, as well as from increases in the size of other rural occupations (such as rural professional services, defense activities, and recreational services).

Keywords

Occupational Hazard Rural Work Rural Industry Mold Spore Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cornelia F. Mutel
    • 1
  • Kelley J. Donham
    • 1
  1. 1.Rural Health and Agricultural Medicine Training Program, Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, College of MedicineThe University of IowaIowa CityUSA

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