Interaction between Lipids and the Intercellular Matrix of the Arterial Wall: Its Role in the Evolution of the Atherosclerotic Lesions

  • Ladislas Robert
  • Jean Chaudiere
  • Bernard Jacotot

Abstract

The interaction between lipids and lipoproteins with the cells and the intercellular matrix of the arterial wall is an important factor in the genesis of atherosclerotic lesions. Lipoproteins of all classes present in variable quantities in circulating blood interact with cellular and macromolecular elements of the arterial wall.1, 2, 3

Keywords

Arterial Wall Atherosclerotic Lesion Intimal Proliferation Intercellular Matrix Matrix Macromolecule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ladislas Robert
    • 1
  • Jean Chaudiere
    • 1
  • Bernard Jacotot
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Biochimie du Tissu Conjonctif (GR CNRS N° 40) and Unité de Recherche INSERM sur l’Athérosclérose, Fac. MédecineUniv. Paris XIICRETEIL CedexFrance

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