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Separation by Adsorption

  • Robert K. Scopes
Part of the Springer Advanced Texts in Chemistry book series (SATC)

Abstract

Proteins adsorb to a variety of types of solid phases, usually in a selective manner. Consequently adsorption techniques, especially when adopted in column chromatography, have become widely used; they frequently result in purification steps which give the greatest increase in protein purity, that is, in the case of an enzyme isolation, the greatest increase in specific activity. Although column chromatography is the ideal way of getting optimum resolution, batch-wise adsorption methods should not be forgotten, since they can be very rapid, and so are valuable techniques when speed is a priority (see also Chapter 7). The principal adsorbents for proteins are ion exchangers, calcium phosphate (as a gel or as a crystalline medium), and miscellaneous affinity adsorbents designed for particular types of enzymes. These are discussed in this chapter, following a general introduction to the theory of adsorption chromatography as applied to the isolation of a particular protein.

Keywords

Ionic Strength High Salt Concentration Cyanogen Bromide Affinity Adsorbent Cyanate Ester 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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General References

  1. Amicon Corporation publications (1980) Dye-ligand chromatography: Applications, method, theory of Matrex gel media, Lexington, Mass.Google Scholar
  2. T. C. J. Gribnau, J. Visser, and R. J. F. Nivard (eds.) (1982), Affinity chromatography and related techniques. Elsevier, Amsterdam.Google Scholar
  3. W. B. Jackoby (ed.) (1974), Affinity techniques: Enzyme purification, part B. In Methods in Enzymology, Vol. 34, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  4. C. R. Lowe (1979), An introduction to affinity chromatography. In Laboratory techniques in biochemistry and molecular biology (T. S. Work and R. H. Burdon, eds.), Vol. 7, Part II, Elsevier/North-Holland, Amsterdam.Google Scholar
  5. C. R. Lowe and P. D. G. Dean (1974), Affinity chromatography. Wiley, London.Google Scholar
  6. E. A. Peterson (1970), Cellulosic ion exchangers (T. S. Work and R. H. Burdon, eds.), Vol. 2, Part II, Elsevier/North-Holland, Amsterdam.Google Scholar
  7. Pharmacia Fine Chemicals AB publications (1979), Affinity chromatography: Principles and methods. Uppsala.Google Scholar
  8. Pharmacia Fine Chemicals AB publications (1980), Ion exchange chromatography: Principles and methods. Uppsala.Google Scholar
  9. J. Turkova (1978) Affinity chromatography. Elsevier, Amsterdam.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert K. Scopes
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryLa Trobe UniversityBundooraAustralia

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