Language, Learning and Teaching: Helping Learners to Make Knowledge Their Own

  • Gordon Wells

Abstract

At the moment, in thousands of classrooms around the world, teachers are talking. They are teaching and their pupils are learning. But whether the learners are learning what the teachers are teaching and, still more, whether they are learning because they are being taught are questions that do not have self-evident answers — despite the assurance of some curriculum planners and educational administrators that careful scheduling of the input is the only way to ensure satisfactory output. But is it appro­priate to talk in terms of input and output at all?

Keywords

Language Development Internal Model Language Learning Linguistic Resource Story World 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gordon Wells
    • 1
  1. 1.Ontario Institute for Studies in EducationCanada

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