Cam-Driven, Constant-Acceleration Mössbauer Spectrometer

  • Alan J. Bearden
  • M. G. Hauser
  • P. L. Mattern

Abstract

Mössbauer spectroscopy relies on the first-order relativistic energy shift (ΔE = v/c ) to produce a small (approx. 1:1010 to 1:1014) energy shift in gamma-ray energy, thereby destroying the condition for resonant absorption. For the recoilless radiation emitted by Fes57m and Sn119m, the maximum velocity needed for the study of isomer shift, quadrupole spiittings, and magnetic hyperfine structure is of the order of 1 cm/sec. In general, two types of spectrometers have been used—constant velocity and constant acceleration. The constant-velocity spectrometer, such as constructed from a lathe motion, receives data at one velocity and then is reset to obtain data at a new velocity. Usually each velocity is sampled only once or at most a few times during a run, and any instrumental drifts (detector high voltage, amplifier gain, etc.) or decay of the source will be reflected in the data. For these reasons, constant-velocity spectrometers are usually restricted to cases involving small changes in line shape.

Keywords

Pulse Train Magnetic Hyperfine Structure Radio Company Hemin Chloride Channel Advance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    G. K. Wertheim, The Mössbauer Effect: Principles and Applications ( Academic Press, New York, 1964 ), pp. 19–25.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    E. Kankeleit Rev. Sci. Instr. 35: 194 (1964).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1965

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan J. Bearden
    • 1
  • M. G. Hauser
    • 1
  • P. L. Mattern
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State PhysicsCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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