Muramyl Dipeptides: Prospect for Cancer Treatments and Immunostimulation

  • Shozo Kotani
  • Ichiro Azuma
  • Haruhiko Takada
  • Masachika Tsujimoto
  • Yuichi Yamamura
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 166)

Abstract

It has been well established that bacterial cell walls, especially their peptidoglycan portions, exhibit a number of biological activities capable of modulating host defense mechanisms in various ways. Table 1 summarizes the activities detected by in vivo assays. The in vivo activities include the modulation (mainly potentiation) of antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses and the stimulation of reticuloendothelial system. These activities possibly relate to the other effects such as antigenspecific and nonspecific enhancement of host resistance to microbial infections and tumor development, and the induction of autoimmune diseases such as an experimental allergic encephalomyelitis with encephalitogenic antigens and “adjuvant” arthritis with or without foreign antigens. Other reported activities are concerned with the induction of a transient leukopenia, the following leukocytosis and the lasting monocytosis, the pyrogenicity, the induction of acute inflammatory reaction, epitheloid granulomas and recurrent multinodular lesions, the provocation of necrotic inflammation at the site prepared with tubercle bacilli, a transient decrease and the following increase of serum complement component levels, the promotion and inhibition of sleep, and others.

Keywords

Bacterial Cell Wall Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis Adjuvant Activity Muramyl Dipeptide Brucella Abortus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shozo Kotani
    • 1
  • Ichiro Azuma
    • 2
  • Haruhiko Takada
    • 1
  • Masachika Tsujimoto
    • 1
  • Yuichi Yamamura
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyOsaka University Dental SchoolKita-ku, Osaka 530Japan
  2. 2.Institute of Immunological ScienceHokkaido UniversityKita-ku Sapporo 060Japan
  3. 3.Osaka UniversityYamadagami, Suita 565Japan

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