An Object Management System for Office Applications

  • Stanley B. Zdonik
Part of the Management and Information Systems book series (MIS)

Abstract

The field of data processing has traditionally been concerned with data intensive applications. That is, the complexity of the data in these applications dominates the complexity of the processes. A program that prints a report listing the outstanding accounts receivable is relatively simple compared to the structure of the general accounting data of the firm.

Keywords

Object Type Office Environment Conceptual Object Type Hierarchy Dynamic Reference 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley B. Zdonik
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA

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