Dietary Protein and Cardiovascular Diseases: Effects of Dietary Protein on Plasma Cholesterol Levels and Cholesterol Metabolism

  • K. K. Carroll
  • M. W. Huff
Part of the Nutrition and Food Science book series (NFS, volume 3)

Abstract

Experiments in our laboratory have shown that the hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis observed in rabbits fed semipurified, cholesterol-free diets are due to the use of casein as the protein component of such diets. Both the hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis can be prevented by using isolated soy protein rather casein as dietary protein1–3. Feeding trials with protein preparations from a variety of different sources indicated that, in general, animal proteins cause a rise in plasma cholesterol while plant proteins give low levels comparable to those in rabbits on commercial feed1, 2, 4, 5 (Fig. 1).

Keywords

Dietary Protein Plasma Cholesterol FABA Bean Animal Protein Soybean Protein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. K. Carroll
    • 1
  • M. W. Huff
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of BiochemistryUniv. of Western OntarioLondonCanada

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