Advertisement

Receiving and Shipping

  • Kenneth B. Ackerman

Abstract

In many organizations, particularly manufacturing companies, there is a distinct division of responsibility between receiving and shipping. Goods being received are controlled by the purchasing manager, while goods to be shipped are controlled by the traffic manager. Unfortunately, however, in too many cases there is poor communication between the purchasing and traffic departments. As a result, there is a tendency for receiving department personnel to have a life full of surprises—such as trucks showing up without notice to the warehouse manager. When such surprises provide substantial unloading volume, they can be seriously disruptive to the warehouse work schedule.

Keywords

Truck Driver Order Picker Prima Facie Case Common Carrier Warehouse Manager 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    From an interview with Burr Hupp, Executive Director of Warehousing Education and Research Council, in Traffic Management, Cahners Publishing Co., November, 1982.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    From a technical paper by Leon Cohan of T. Marzetti Company, Columbus, Ohio and published by Warehousing education and Research Council.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    From a technical paper by Leon Cohan of T. Marzetti Company, Columbus, Ohio and published by Warehousing Education and Research Council, December, 1984.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth B. Ackerman

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations