Measuring Productivity

  • Kenneth B. Ackerman

Abstract

Why measure work in the first place? For four reasons: First, work measurement helps schedule labor requirements provided there is enough lead time for day-to-day planning. Second, work measurement will identify and correct problems. This doesn’t mean we punish the lazy worker, but it could mean that we improve teamwork, stop bottlenecks created by an inefficient plant or equipment, or simply create an awareness of productivity among those who are best able to improve the situation. And third, work measurement will identify the need for change. Every business is undergoing constant change with new products added and old ones deleted. A work measurement system will show when there is a significant change to our operating environment. Fourth, and perhaps most important, measurement should insure that we charge our customers correctly for work performed1.

Keywords

Measuring Productivity Work Content Market Publication Order Picking Line Item 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    From “Work Measurement and Productivity,” an article by Joel C. Wolff, President, Drake Sheahan/Stewart Dougall Inc. Published in Vol. 14, No. 6 of Warehousing and Physical Distribution Productivity Report. Marketing Publications Inc., Silver Spring, MD.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Distribution/Warehouse Cost Digest, Vol. 9, No. 24, Marketing Publications Inc., Silver Spring, MD.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    The next five subchapters are from Joel C. Wolff, op. cit.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    From an article by Norman E. Landes, President, Slidemasters Inc., Vol. 15, No. 8, Warehousing and Physical Distribution Productivity Report. Marketing Publications Inc., Silver Spring, MD.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    From “Tools for Measuring Productivity” by Richard E. Nelson, Pfizer Inc., in Warehousing and Physical Distribution Productivity Report, Vol. 14, No. 8. Marketing Publications Inc., Silver Spring, MD.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    From Vol. 19, No. 3, Warehousing and Physical Distribution Productivity Report. Marketing Publications Inc., Silver Spring, MD.Google Scholar
  7. 7.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth B. Ackerman

There are no affiliations available

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