Behavioral Treatment

  • Keith McBurnett
  • Steven A. Hobbs
  • Benjamin B. Lahey

Abstract

In the overview of behavioral treatment of childhood psychopathology presented in the first edition of this handbook (Hobbs & Lahey, 1983), we described many of the techniques of child behavior therapy and their applications to the psychological problems of children. The techniques described continue to represent the bulk of the arsenal used in the behavioral approach. However, in one sense, the field has reached a plateau of technological maturity. The flurry of new techniques appearing in the 1960s and 1970s has resulted in a comprehensive methodology that continues to be refined and to find new applications, but that has not seen major revisions in the 1980s. Therefore, this chapter omits descriptions of individual behavioral “techniques” in an effort to summarize the major features of child behavior therapy and current developments in the field.

Keywords

Behavior Therapy Behavioral Treatment Autistic Child Parent Training Apply Behavior Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith McBurnett
    • 1
    • 2
  • Steven A. Hobbs
    • 3
  • Benjamin B. Lahey
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  2. 2.Psychology Service, Department of Rehabilitation MedicineBellevue HospitalNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Medical CenterUniversity of Oklahoma, Tulsa Medical CollegeTulsaUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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