Lakes pp 65-89 | Cite as

Sedimentary Processes in Lakes

  • P. G. Sly

Abstract

The formation and behavior of lacustrine sediments is dominated by the interaction of a number of physical processes whose relative importance is influenced, particularly, by the form of the basin, its orientation and size, and by climatic conditions. The range of lake types and their sedimentary characteristics are widely diverse. Despite apparent differences, however, it is important to realize that essentially the same relationships may be used to express sediment response to dynamics forces in almost all lake systems.

Keywords

Sediment Transport Great Lake Lake Basin Wind Wave Large Lake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • P. G. Sly

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