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Abstract

Tetanus is an infectious but noncontagious disease of man and certain animals (principally horses) caused by a toxin excreted by the gram-positive, anerobic, spore-forming bacillus Clostridium tetani, the tetanus bacillus. The organism is a natural inhabitant of the intestinal tract of horses, cows, sheep, dogs, rats, hens, other domestic animals, and man.(74) Understandably, the spores have been found in soil and dirt over most of the world, and have turned up in house dust, improperly sterilized bandages, and indeed almost anywhere that contamination from soil could arise. Whether the tetanus bacillus is a natural inhabitant of soil or whether it is there only because it is left there by animal droppings is not settled. It infects man and other susceptible animals by entering via a wound, splinter, nail puncture, or almost any other injury into which dirt contaminated with tetanus spores may be inserted.

Keywords

Tetanus Toxoid Tetanus Toxin Neonatal Tetanus Potassium Alum Severe Tetanus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

  1. Very few books deal with tetanus comprehensively. Topley and Wilson’s Principles of Bacteriology and Immunity (73) is probably the most comprehensive as well as the most readable and entertaining source if general information on the subject is needed. For broadening one’s outlook in special areas, see the publications in references 1, 3, 4, 10, 25, 31, 33, 46, 53, 68, 75—and many others.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Geoffrey Edsall
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.University HillsUSA
  2. 2.Department of Applied Microbiology, EmeritusHarvard School of Public HealthUSA
  3. 3.Department of Microbiology, EmeritusLondon School of Hygiene and Tropical MedicineUK

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