Syphilis

  • Rudolph H. Kampmeier

Abstract

Syphilis (lues venerea) in caused by Treponema pallidum and transmitted with rare exceptions from person to person by direct contact with infectious lesions. Transmission in almost all instances accompanies sexual acts, including kissing, whether hetero- or homosexual. The disease is systemic from the beginning. The portal of entry is usually marked by the appearance of an initial lesion after an incubation period of 2–3 weeks that is followed in most instances by cutaneous eruptions, erosions of mucous membranes, lymphadenopathy, and constitutional symptoms. Clinical relapse may occur in the earlier months of untreated disease. The disease then enters a latent stage that in most instances, even in its untreated course, persists for the remainder of the patient’s life.

Keywords

Congenital Syphilis Secondary Syphilis Early Syphilis General Paresis Oslo Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rudolph H. Kampmeier
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, EmeritusVanderbilt University School of MedicineNashvilleUSA

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