Pneumococcal Infections

  • Maxwell Finland

Abstract

In his classic book entitled The Biology of the Pneumococcus published in 1938, Benjamin White(89) listed 19 different names applied to the pneumococcus between 1897 and 1930, the year when the 4th edition of Bergey’s ManuaI (6) approved the designation Diplococcus pneumoniae Weichselbaum. In the most recent (8th) edition of Bergey’s Manual,(9) it is listed as Streptococcus pneumoniae, the designation now generally accepted.

Keywords

Otitis Medium Streptococcus Pneumoniae Pneumococcal Disease Pneumococcal Vaccine Pneumococcal Meningitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

  1. Finland, M., Recent advances in the epidemiology of pneumococcal infections, Medicine 21:307–344 (1942) (332 refs.).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Heffron, R., Pneumonia with Special Reference to Pneumococcus Lobar Pneumonia, Commonwealth Fund, New York, 1939, 1086 pp.; reprinted by Harvard University Press, 1979 (1471 refs.).Google Scholar
  3. Kass, E. H. (ed.), Assessment of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine: A workshop held at the Harvard Club of Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, Oct. 6, 1980, Rev. Infect. Dis. 3(Suppl.):S1–S197 (1981) (213 refs.).Google Scholar
  4. Mufson, M. A., Pneumococcal infections, J. Am. Med. Assoc. 246:1942–1948 (1981) (132 refs.).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Quie, P. G., Giebink, G. S., and Winkelstein, J. A. (guest eds.), The Pneumococcus: A symposium held at the Kroc Foundation Headquarters, Santa Ynez Valley, California, February 25–29, 1980, Rev. Infect. Dis. 3:183–371 (1981) (197 refs.).Google Scholar
  6. White, B. (with the collaboration of Robinson, E. S., and Barnes, L. A., The Biology of Pneumococcus: The Bacteriological, Biochemical and Immunological Characters and Activities of Diplococcus pneumoniae, Commonwealth Fund, New York, 1938, xvii + 799 pp.; reprinted by Harvard University Press, 1979 (1593 refs.).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maxwell Finland
    • 1
  1. 1.Boston City HospitalBostonUSA

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