Ultraviolet-Light-Induced Transformation of Human Primary Cells

  • Betsy M. Sutherland

Abstract

Understanding solar induction of skin cancer in man at the molecular level demands the development of experimental systems for probing this, the most frequent of all human cancers. A good model system should fulfill at least three criteria: first, the response should be light-dependent, with a low background (light-independent) response. Second, the system should be based on human cells, preferably primary skin cells from normal individuals. Third, after the oncogenic treatment, the responding cells should have properties similar to those cancers produced in man. Such systems should provide an excellent complement to the experimental UV-oncogenesis systems in rodents, which allow experimental manipulation of the intact animal but are subject to differences between rodents and humans in response to UV damage. They will also be useful in conjunction with the human epidemiological studies, which provide both prospective and predictive information on human populations, but are not amenable to experimental manipulation.

Keywords

Soft Agar Action Spectrum Human Diploid Fibroblast Syrian Hamster Embryo Human Epidemiological Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Betsy M. Sutherland
    • 1
  1. 1.Biology DepartmentBrookhaven National LaboratoryUptonUSA

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