A Model for Mental Workload in Tasks Requiring Continuous Information Processing

  • William H. Levison
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 8)

Abstract

The object of this paper is to define and justify a model for mental workload that is appropriate to tasks in which a human operator is required to process sensory information in a continuous fashion. The primary application of this model has been to continuous manual tracking tasks, although certain non-tracking tasks are also candidates for application. The model appears to be most useful as a design and evaluation tool for predicting the relationship between performance and workload; measurements of workload using concepts suggested by the model can be obtained only under highly constrained situations.

Keywords

Human Operator Secondary Task Tracking Task Observation Noise Mental Workload 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • William H. Levison
    • 1
  1. 1.Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc.CambridgeUSA

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