Cellulose: Elusive Component of the Plant Cell Wall

  • Ed J. Soltes
Part of the NATO Advanced Science Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 67)

Abstract

It has been repeated often that plant cellulose is the most abundant natural material on this earth. At approximately 50 percent of all biomass, annual production is about 50 billion tons (Goldstein 1981). Because it is natural and thus potentially available in perpetuity assuming that plants are managed properly, and because it is abundant, cellulose should be an increasingly important resource for our material, energy and food needs. However, cellulose for the most part remains a somewhat elusive resource. Why?

Keywords

Plant Cell Wall American Chemical Society Kansas City Secondary Wall Middle Lamella 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ed J. Soltes
    • 1
  1. 1.Forest Science LaboratoryTexas A & M UniversityCollege StationUSA

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