An Acoustic Image Sensor Using a Transmit-Receive Array

  • M. G. Maginness
  • J. D. Plummer
  • J. D. Meindl

Abstract

A preliminary model of a novel acoustic image sensor which utilizes a multiplexed area array of transducers operating in a transmit-receive mode has been developed. The major components of the system include: 1) an acoustic lens for focusing the transmitted energy of an array element on the corresponding object element, 2) an area or two-dimensional array of acoustic transducers formed within a monolithic wafer of piezoelectric ceramic material; 3) an array of silicon monolithic integrated circuits located immediately adjacent to the piezoelectric array; each integrated circuit performs the transmit/receive multiplexing for several transducer array elements; 4) an analogue signal processor consisting of high power transmit circuitry as well as sensitive receiver circuitry including preamplifiers, swept gain amplifiers and function generators, filters, gain compressors and detectors; 5) a digital controller which permits a) any single array element or any row or column of array elements to operate in the A-scan mode, b) any row or column of array elements to operate in the B-scan mode or c) the full array of elements to operate in the C-scan mode; and 6) a display subsystem consisting of a cathode ray display and interface circuitry which provides an M-scan mode and interpolation in the C-scan mode. The image sensor operates at an acoustic frequency of 3.5 MHz and is intended for use in medical diagnostics.

Keywords

Switch Resistance Transducer Array Single Access Port Signal Transfer Function Acoustic Holography 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. G. Maginness
    • 1
  • J. D. Plummer
    • 1
  • J. D. Meindl
    • 1
  1. 1.Electrical Engineering DepartmentStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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