Alphavirus Pathogenesis and Immunity

  • Diane E. Griffin
Part of the The Viruses book series (VIRS)

Abstract

Most alphavirus infections in nature occur in wild birds, rodents, and occasionally reptiles and amphibians. Some of these natural hosts sustain a relatively asymptomatic, prolonged, high-titered viremia, facilitating transmission of the virus by mosquitoes (Chamberlain, 1980). Although there is undoubtedly mortality and morbidity in the wild due to alphavirus infections, many native species have inapparent infection, and epizootic, epidemic, or endemic disease is usually recognized after mosquito-mediated transmission to a domestic host (e.g., horses, pigeons, captive pheasants) or to man. Affected individuals develop a wide range of symptoms, including fever, skin rashes, arthritis, myositis, and/or encephalitis. Depending on the virus and on the host, the infection may be clinically inapparent or cause fulminant disease and death (Shope, 1980).

Keywords

Athymic Nude Mouse Semliki Forest Virus Sindbis Virus Avirulent Strain Sialic Acid Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diane E. Griffin
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Medicine and NeurologyThe Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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